Classical Numismatic Group > Auction 121Auction date: 6 October 2022
Lot number: 1199

Price realized: 400 USD   (Approx. 406 EUR)   Note: Prices do not include buyer's fees.
Lot description:


IRELAND. Memorial badge for William O'Connell, IRA. Engraved on a 1918 British florin (28mm, 11.20 g, 12h). Dated 14 October 1920. WM O' CONNELL/ KILLED/ IN DUBLIN/ 14.10.'20 engraved on the obverse. Pierced for suspension. VF.

By 1912, Irish nationalists had succeeded in achieving home rule for Ireland and, in the general election of 1918, Sinn Féin would win a majority of the island's seats in the British Parliament. Instead of heading to Westminster, they instead assembled the First Dáil Éireann (Irish Assembly) On 21 January 1919, they declared the independent Republic of Ireland. Violence began shortly thereafter. The Irish Republican Army, independent of the Assembly, began targeting members of the Royal Irish Constabulary, which in turn elicited harsh responses from the British. Guerilla fighting and civil disobedience shook the island from 1919-1921, in a conflict now known as the Irish War of Independence. About 2300 people were killed, including close to 900 civilians. On 6 December 1921, the Anglo-Irish Treaty was signed, creating the Irish Free State and establishing what would prove to be merely a temporary truce.

William O'Connell, born in county Cork in 1899, served in D Company, 1st Battalion, Dublin Brigade of the Irish Republican Army. On 14 October 1920, he participated in an ambush of a weekly payroll shipment. As the IRA men were approaching the Rolls-Royce armored car, one of their guns accidentally discharged. The guards sprang into action, peppering the assailants and nearby civilians with fire from the car's mounter Vickers machine gun and, though the car was ultimately seized, O'Connell was shot through the head and killed. Military authorities ordered the attendees at his funeral limited to only 50. O'Connell's death is commemorated on a monument in his hometown of Glantane, county Cork, as well as on a plaque in Phibsborough Road, Dublin.

Estimate: 500 USD

Match 1:
Classical Numismatic Group > Islamic Auction 2Auction date: 27 October 2022
Lot number: 329

Price realized: 11,000 USD   (Approx. 10,947 EUR)   Note: Prices do not include buyer's fees.
Lot description:


Ottoman Empire. Abdülhamid II. AH 1293-1327 / AD 1876-1909. Gold Imtiyaz Medal (37mm, 36.18 g, 12h). Dated AH 1300 (AD 1883). In upper cartouche: three-line die-struck legend reading Devlet-i Osmaniye ugrunda fevkalade ibrâz-i sadâkat ve secâat edenlere mahsus madalyadir ('Medal of Merit for outstanding loyalty and bravery on behalf of the Ottoman Empire'); name of recipient al-Imam Yahya Hamid al-Din engraved in curved band below; die-struck date '1300' (the year in which the award was instituted) in frame at bottom. / Toughra of Abdülhamid II, set on sunburst, above trophy of arms with cannon to right and scales of justice to right. Pere 1112; Erüreten p. 252. Tiny piercing at where original suspension (now lacking) would have been affixed. Superb EF. Much original lustre remaining. Extremely rare.

The Imtiyaz Medal (Imtiyaz Madalyasi) was the highest-ranking military award in the Ottoman Empire, instituted by Abdul Hamid II in AH 1300 / AD 1883. It was generally reserved for heads of state amongst Turkey's allies, but was evidently occasionally bestowed on other senior military or diplomatic figures. The first recipients of the Imtiyaz Medal were the Emperors of Germany and Austria-Hungary, whose awards were accompanied by letters from the Sultan dated 30 December 1883 (although the specimen named to Kaiser Wilhelm I is engraved with the date '7 Dhu'l-Hijja 1300', which equates to 9 October 1883). As made, this medal would have been suspended from a red and green silk ribbon, with an elaborate gold openwork suspension bar somewhat similar to the decoration beneath the trophy of arms on the medal itself, connected to a relatively plain suspension loop which was fixed to the medal disk by a simple gold pin. This design seems not to have been particularly robust; other gold Imtiyaz Medals lacking the suspension (as here) are also known, and the specimen named to Kaiser Wilhelm I (Gorny & Mosch auction 197, 9 March 2011, lot 7152, sold for €140,000 hammer) appears to have had a far simpler suspension featuring a plain gold rectangular bar.



Yahya Muhammad Hamid al-Din (18 June AD 1869 – 17 February AD 1948) was born into a branch of the Qasimid dynasty. Following gradual Ottoman incursions into Yemen during the 9/16th century, al-Mansur al-Qasim, the first Qasimid ruler, launched a fightback against the Turks. Under al-Mansur's son, al-Mu'ayyad Muhammad (AH 1029-1054 / AD 1620-1644), the Turks were driven out and the whole of Yemen was unified under Qasimid rule. However, Qasimid rule began to decline from the late 10/16th century onwards, and Turkish forces began to re-establish themselves in Yemen during the 13/19th century. By AH 1289 / AD 1872, Ottoman forces had once again occupied the Yemeni capital, San'a.



Yahya became Imam in AD 1904 following the death of his father, Muhammad al-Mansur. While the Ottomans had stripped the Imams of their secular powers, treating them merely as local religious leaders, Imam Yahya nevertheless retained considerable authority in the mountainous areas of North Yemen and began launching a series of uprisings against Ottoman rule in AD 1905. By AD 1911, the fighting had reached a stalemate, with the Ottomans facing the prospect of war with Italy in Libya, and local support for Imam Yahya's rebellion beginning to crumble. A negotiated settlement suited both parties, and on 18 October 1911 the Treaty of Daan was signed by Imam Yahya and the Ottoman Governor of Yemen, Ahmet Izzet Pasha. Under the terms of the Treaty, Imam Yahya would rule the seven highland districts of Amran, Kawkaban, Dhamar, Yarim, Ibb, Hajjah and Hajjur, which would be governed under Sharia Law rather than Ottoman civil law, while the Ottomans would retain the coastal district of the Tihama. Meanwhile, Imam Yahya agreed to relinquish the title 'Commander of the Faithful', which he and his predecessors had previously held, in exchange for an undertaking from the Ottomans to support him against any future rivals to the Imamate as well as a generous subsidy from the Ottoman treasury.



The Ottoman Empire fell at the end of the First World War, and news of these developments reached Yemen on 14 November 1918. Three days later, Imam Yahya entered San'a where, following meetings and discussion with tribal leaders and other prominent dignitaries, he was proclaimed supreme ruler of all Yemen. Ottoman officials who were prepared to stay in Yemen were retained in post, with a view to maintaining an effective administrative infrastructure. A regular army was formed in 1919, and army cadets were being sent for training in Iraq by the 1930s. The first of many treaties which acknowledged Yemen as a sovereign state was signed with Italy in 1926, and following the Saudi – Yemeni War of 1934 the border between these two countries was fixed under the terms of the Treaty of Taif. However, Imam Yahya refused to recognise his southern border with the British Aden Protectorate, resulting in friction and occasional clashes between Yemen and the British authorities.



Imam Yahya was shot and killed during an attempted coup on 17 February 1948. Following his assassination, a member of the rival Sayyid dynasty, Abdullah b. Ahmad al-Wazir, seized power for several weeks before being overthrown and executed by Saudi-backed forces led by Imam Yahya's son, Ahmad. Ahmad b. Yahya remained as ruler of the Yemen until his own death in 1962.



Throughout his life, Imam Yahya refused to have his portrait painted or his photograph taken. The image shown here comes from the frontispiece to Ameen Rihani's book Arabian Peak And Desert, Travels In Al Yaman (1930). If it is an accurate likeness of Imam Yahya, it was presumably drawn from memory.

Estimate: 15000 USD

Match 2:
MDC Monnaies de Collection sarl > Auction 10Auction date: 13 October 2022
Lot number: 312

Price realized: Unsold
Lot description:


FRANCE / CAPÉTIENS
Charles V (1364-1380). Royal d'or ND (août 1364).
PCGS MS63 (45080460).
Av. °K'O'L° REX° - 'FRANCOR'°. Le Roi debout sous un dais gothique, couronné, tenant le sceptre ; quadrilobes sur les montants.
Rv. + XP'C° VINCIT° XP'C° REGNAT° XP'C° IMPERAT. Croix quadrilobée, feuillue et fleurdelisée, dans un quadrilobe tréflé cantonné de quatre couronnelles.

Dy.357 (Non retrouvé) - H.1 (non retrouvé) - C.454 (Charles de Navarre) - L.369 (Non retrouvé) - Fr.283 (no record of issue) ; Or - 3,88 g - 28 mm - 7 h

Top Pop : c'est le seul exemplaire gradé !
PCGS MS63 (45080460). Ponctuation par annelets pointés. Cet exemplaire a peu circulé, avec les surfaces à peine brunies et conserve de sa fraîcheur. Poids réduit et module de 28 millimètres : pour Charles V dont le Royal d'or n'avait pas été identifié ! Rarissime. Superbe.

Le Royal d'or de Charles V décrit dans Ciani (n° 454) est en réalité de Charles II, roi de Navarre (Lafaurie, BSFN, 1956, p.67-68 et Dumas, BSFN, 1958, p.210-211). Lafaurie décrit les conditions mais ne connaît pas le Royal de Charles V. Plus récemment, Duplessy indique "type inconnu (probablement semblable à celui de Jean II)" et "non retrouvé". Toutefois, des recherches approfondies permettent de proposer une attribution de notre exemplaire à Charles V.
Le Royal d'or de Charles V est ordonné à un poids semblable à celui du franc à cheval de Jean le Bon et du futur franc à cheval, le 24 juillet 1364, avec un titre de 1.000 ‰ (24 carats), un poids de 3,885 g (63 pièces au marc) et un cours de 20 sols tournois. L'exécutoire est du 31 juillet 1364. Aux Archives Nationales, le registre Z1b/56 indique : « Charles, par la grâce de Dieu, roy de France. À noz amez et féauls les générauls maistres de noz Monnoies, salut et dilection. Savoir faisons que... de nous et de notre Conseil eue avec plusieurs prélaz, barons, des gens de bonnes villes de notre royaume et autres, avons voulu et ordené et par ces présentes vouons et ordenons et vous mandons que tantost et sanz délai vous faciez faire et ouvrer par toutes et chascunes noz Monnoyes deniers d'or fin qui seront appellez et nommez réaus d'or, lesquelx soient de LXIII de pois au marc de Paris et auront cours pour XX sols tournois la pièce... Donné à Paris le XXIIIe de juillet l'an MCCCLXIIII ».
Une fabrication est prouvée dans au moins trois ateliers : Rouen (1.500 pièces, compte du 20 avril au 18 août 1364, délivrances les 17 et 18 août), Toulouse (7.000 pièces, compte du 6 août au 25 octobre 1364, 1ère délivrance le 12 septembre) et Montpellier (16.000 pièces, compte du 14 août au 25 décembre 1364, 1ère délivrance le 10 septembre), et des ordres de fabrication ont été signifiés à Paris, Tournai, Saint-Quentin, Dijon et Angers.
Un royal d'or de Charles V a été publié pour la première fois en 1973 par Georges Savès et Leandre Villaronga à partir de l'exemplaire n° 42 du trésor de Grenade-sur-Garonne (Haute-Garonne, 1881), sans que cela ait été relevé par les numismates. Cette pièce, illustrée p. 179, est décrite avec certaines caractéristiques : poids de 3,88 g, légende de droit .K0L.R...FRAnCOR, ponctuation par annelets pointés, flan visiblement large (rogné) avec un diamètre vertical de 27,3 mm et latéral de 27,8 mm.
De nouveaux éléments favorables à cette identification faite par Savès et Villaronga sont apportés en 1993 par Marc Bompaire, un des plus éminents spécialistes du monnayage royal et féodal français, dans un article du Bulletin de la Société française de numismatique, avec notamment l'illustration d'un tel royal dans la plus ancienne liste de monnaies d'or illustrées que l'on connaisse (BnF, ms. nouv. acq. Fr. 4139, début XVe siècle). On doit noter que le cabinet des Médailles de la Bibliothèque nationale de France possède 6 Royaux d'Or, classés à Charles IV. Or, 2 d'entre eux sont désormais reclassés à Charles V : Chabouillet 411 (3,85 g) et Collection Côte 764 (3,80 g).
Notre exemplaire possède de nombreux éléments qui permettent de confirmer cette très rare fabrication. Il possède des caractéristiques variées du Royal d'Or de Charles IV. La légende de droit est sur notre exemplaire FRANCOR et non FRA°COR et la ponctuation est par annelets pointés et non par simples annelets. On note aussi la présence de quadrilobe sur les montants du dais gothique qui manquent à celui de Charles IV. Par ailleurs, notre exemplaire est parfaitement au poids prescrit (3,885 g). Avec ce poids et un module légèrement supérieur à celui de Charles IV, notre exemplaire est assurément un Royal d'or de Charles V, jusqu'à présent non identifié clairement. Notre exemplaire est de très beau style, et d'état de conservation nettement supérieur aux quelques exemplaires connus (BnF)

Bibliographie :
Savès (G.), Villaronga (L.).- Les monnaies de la péninsule ibérique trouvées en France dans la région Midi-Pyrénées.- Acta numismatica III.- Barcelona, 1973.
Bompaire (M.).- Le royal d'or de Charles V : nouveaux témoignages.- Bulletin de la Société française de numismatique.- mai 1993, p. 556-560, fig.
Dumas (F.).- Royal d'or de Charles V.- Bulletin de la Société française de numismatique.- mai 1958.- p. 210-211.
シャルル5世 (1364-1380) ロイヤル金貨 (ロワイヤル ・ドール) 年号なし (1364年8月)
表面:「°K'O'L° REX° - 'FRANCOR'°」 支柱に四つ葉モチーフを施したゴシック様式の天蓋の下、冠を戴き、王笏を持つ王の立像
裏面:「+ XP'C° VINCIT° XP'C° REGNAT° XP'C° IMPERAT. 」 四つ葉、葉、百合をつけた飾り十字、その十字を囲む大きな四つ葉、さらにその周りに4つの王冠
Dy.357 (現存不明) - H.1 (現存不明) - C.454 (シャルル・ド・ナヴァール) - L.369 (現存不明) - Fr.283 (発行記録なし) ; Gold - 3,88 g - 28 mm - 7 h.
Top Pop : 唯一鑑定品!
PCGS MS63. 白丸印で区切られた銘文 ほぼ研磨されていない素材表面 ほとんど使用されておらず、製造時の状態を保つ一枚 重量を減らした直径28mm型:シャルル5世のロイヤル金貨は現存確認されていなかった! 極めて希少 極美品

Ciani (No.454) に記載されたシャルル5世ロイヤル金貨は、実際にはシャルル2世・ナヴァール王ロイヤル金貨です (Lafaurie / BSFN (Bulletin de la Société Française de Numismatique フランス貨幣協会会報), 1956年, p.67-68 / Dumas, BSFN, 1958年, p.210-211)。Lafaurieにシャルル5世ロイヤル金貨製造の記述はありますが、現存は確認されていません。最近では、Duplessyに"不詳タイプ (おそらくジャン2世金貨に類似)"とされ、 "現存不明"との記載があります。しかしながら、徹底的調査の結果、当該コインはシャルル5世ロイヤル金貨と呼ぶのが妥当と思われます。
シャルル5世ロイヤル金貨は、1364年7月24日、ジャン2世 (ジャン・ル・ボン) フラン・ア・シュヴァル金貨、および後のフラン・ア・シュヴァル金貨と同様の重量に決められました :純度1000 ‰ (24カラット)、重量3,885g (63枚/マルク)、20ソル・トゥルノワと等価として、1364年7月31日発行。国立公文書館の記録「Z1b/56」: « (古フランス語原文) Charles, par la grâce de Dieu, roy de France. À noz amez et féauls les générauls maistres de noz Monnoies, salut et dilection. Savoir faisons que... de nous et de notre Conseil eue avec plusieurs prélaz, barons, des gens de bonnes villes de notre royaume et autres, avons voulu et ordené et par ces présentes vouons et ordenons et vous mandons que tantost et sanz délai vous faciez faire et ouvrer par toutes et chascunes noz Monnoyes deniers d'or fin qui seront appellez et nommez réaus d'or, lesquelx soient de LXIII de pois au marc de Paris et auront cours pour XX sols tournois la pièce... Donné à Paris le XXIIIe de juillet l'an MCCCLXIIII ».
少なくとも3ヵ所での製造が確認されています。ルーアン造幣所 (1500枚, 製造期間1364/4/20〜8/18, 発行日8/17-18)、トゥールーズ造幣所 (7000枚, 製造期間1364/8/6〜10/25, 第1次発行日9/12)、モンペリエ造幣所 (16000 枚, 製造期間1364/8/14〜12/25,第1次発行日9/10)。貨幣製造命令は、パリ、トゥルネ、サン=カンタン、ディジョン、アンジェに出されました。
1973年、初めて一枚のシャルル5世ロイヤル金貨の存在を公表したのは、貨幣学者ではなく、考古学者Georges Savès およびLeandre Villarongaでした。両者によるグルナッド=シュル=ガロンヌの遺宝 (オート=ガロンヌ県1881年発掘) 記録の42番目として、179ページにその金貨の写真付きで特徴が記載されています:重量3.885g / 表面に白丸印で区切られた銘文
/ 「K0L.R...FRAnCOR」 / 切り出された大きな円行 (えんぎょう) の直径 縦27.3 mm, 横27.8 mm.
Savès ・Villaronga両氏が示した特徴に加え、1993年 、この金貨を識別できる要素が新たにもたらされました 。フランス王国・封建時代の貨幣専門第一人者Marc Bompaire氏が、BSFN (Bulletin de la Société Française de Numismatique フランス貨幣協会会報) に記事を掲載し、金貨図案の最も古いとされるリスト(フランス国立図書館, ms. nouv. acq. Fr. 4139, 15世紀初頭)の、このようなロイヤル貨の図案を用いて示しました。注目すべき点は、フランス国立図書館メダル陳列室にシャルル4世ロイヤル金貨が6枚収蔵されていますが、そのうち2枚は、以後、シャルル5世に分類されるということです : Chabouillet 411 (3,85 g), Collection Côte 764 (3,80 g).
当該コインには、この大変希少な金貨であることを示す多くの証拠が見られます。シャルル4世ロイヤル金貨の様々な特徴を備え、表面の銘文は「FRA°COR」ではなく「FRANCOR」、銘文を区切るのは「丸印」ではなく、丸の中に点のある「白丸印」。また、ゴシック様式の天蓋の支柱に施された四つ葉モチーフは、シャルル4世ロイヤル金貨にはありません。さらに、その重さは正確な規定重量の3,885gです。 重量、そしてシャルル4世貨よりわずかに大きな直径からして、当該コインは、これまで現存がはっきり確認されてこなかった「シャルル5世ロイヤル金貨」で間違いありません。大変見事なスタイルで、その保存状態も国立図書館所蔵のものより格段に良好です。

参考文献 :
G.Savès, L.Villaronga・共著 『Les monnaies de la péninsule ibérique trouvées en France dans la région Midi-Pyrénées.』- Acta numismatica III.- Barcelona, 1973年
M.Bompaire・著 『Le royal d'or de Charles V : nouveaux témoignages.』- Bulletin de la Société française de numismatique (フランス貨幣協会会報), 1993年5月, p. 556-560, fig.
F.Dumas・著 『Royal d'or de Charles V.』- Bulletin de la Société française de numismatique, 1958年5月, p. 210-211.

Charles V (1364-1380). Gold Royal ND (august 1364).
Obv. °K'O'L° REX° - 'FRANCOR'°. King standing under a gothic dais, crowned, holding a scepter ; quatrefoils on the uprights.
Rev. + XP'C° VINCIT° XP'C° REGNAT° XP'C° IMPERAT. Quatrefoiled cross, leafy and flowered, in a trefoil quatrefoil confined with 4 little crowns.
Dy.357 (Not found) - H.1 (not found) - C.454 (Charles de Navarre) - L.369 (Not found) - Fr.283 (no record of issue) ; Gold - 3,88 g - 28 mm - 7h.
Top Pop : this is the only graded specimen !
PCGS MS63. Ponctuation using pointed ringlets. This specimen hasn't circulated much, with barely burnished surfaces. Reduced weight and 28 millimeters module : for Charles V whose Gold Royal had not been identified ! Very rare. Uncirculated.

The Gold Royal of Charles V described in the Ciani (n°454) is in fact of Charles II, King of Navarre (Lafaurie, BSFN, 1956, p.67-68 and Dumas, BSFN, 1958, p.210-211). Lafaurie describes the conditions of making but doesn't know any specimen. More recently, Duplessy mentions "unknown type (probably similar to Jean II's)" and "not found". However, an extensive research make it possible for us to propose an attribution for our specimen to Charles V.
The Gold Royal of Charles V is expected to weight the same as the Franc à Cheval of Jean le Bon and the future Franc à Cheval, on the july 24th of 1364, with a gold title of 1000‰ (24 karat), a weight of 3.885 grams (63 coins for a mark) and a value of 20 sols tournois. The executive order is dated july 31 1364. At the Archives Nationales, the Z1b/56 register indicates : "Charles, by the grace of God, king of France. To our friendly and royals general masters of our Coins, greatings and order. We let know that... from us and our meeting with several prelats, barons, people from good cities of the realm and others, wish and order, and ask that quickly and without waiting you shall create gold coins that will be called Gold Royals, the weight being a 1/63th of a mark from Paris and the value being 20 sols tournois each... Paris, on the 23rd of July 1364."

The production of those coins has been proven in 3 mint places : Rouen (1500 coins, account from the 20th of april to the 18th of august 1364, delivered in the 17th and 18th of august), Toulouse (7000 coins, account from the 6th of august to the 25th of october 1364, first delivered on the 12th of september) and Montpellier (16000 coins, account from the 14th of august to the 25th of december 1364, first delivered on the 10th of september). Some production orders have been given in Paris, Tournai, Saint-Quentin, Dijon and Angers.

A Gold Royal for Charles V has been published for the first time in 1973 by Georges Savès and Leandre Villaronga, specimen n°42 of the Grenade-sur-Garonne's treasure (Haute-Garonne, 1881), but was not noticed by numismatists. This coin, illustrated page 179, is described using a few caracteristics : weight of 3.88g, (obverse legend) .KOL.R...FRAnCOR, ponctuation using pointed ringlets, large flan (cropped) measuring 27.3mm vertical and 27.8 horizontal.

New elements corroborating the Savès and Villaronga's identification are brought to light by Marc Bompaire, one of the most prominent french royal and feudal coinage expert, in 1993 in an article published in the Bulletin de la Société francaise de Numismatique. In this article is presented an illustration of a Gold Royal coming from the oldest list of illustrated gold coins known (BnF, ms. nouv. acq Fr 4139, early 15th century.)

The Cabinet des Médailles of the Bibliothèque nationale de France had 6 Gold Royals, all attributed to Charles IV. 2 of them have been re-attributed to Charles V : Chabouillet 411 (3.85g) and Côte Collection 764 (3.8g).

Our specimen has some caracteristics that allow us to attribute it to this very rare fabrication. Those caracteristics are different compared to a Charles IV Gold Royal's ones. The obverse legend is FRANCOR and not FRA°COR. The ponctuation uses pointed ringlets, and not simple ones. There is also quatrefoils on the uprights of the gothic dais, missing on the Charles IV's. Otherwise, our specimen has the perfect prescribed weight (3.885 g). With this weight and a module slightly larger to the one of Charles IV, our specimen is certainly a Gold Royal for Charles V, which was not yet clearly identified. Our specimen has a beautiful style and his conservation is by far superior compared to the few others known (BnF).

Bibliography :
Savès (G.), Villaronga (L.).- Les monnaies de la péninsule ibérique trouvées en France dans la région Midi-Pyrénées.- Acta numismatica III.- Barcelona, 1973.
Bompaire (M.).- Le royal d'or de Charles V : nouveaux témoignages.- Bulletin de la Société française de numismatique.- may 1993, p. 556-560, fig.
Dumas (F.).- Royal d'or de Charles V.- Bulletin de la Société française de numismatique.- may 1958.- p. 210-211..



Starting price: 120000 EUR