Roma Numismatics Ltd > E-Sale 99Auction date: 7 July 2022
Lot number: 910

Price realized: 850 GBP   (Approx. 1,013 USD / 993 EUR)   Note: Prices do not include buyer's fees.
Show similar lots on CoinArchives

Find similar lots in upcoming
auctions on
  NumisBids.com
Lot description:


Julius Caesar AR Denarius. Military mint travelling with Caesar, 48-47 BC. Diademed female head to right, wearing oak-wreath; LII (Caesar's age) behind / Trophy of Gallic arms, wearing horned helmet, holding oval shield ornamented with thunderbolt and carnyx in other hand; securis to right, CAE-SAR across lower field. Crawford 452/2; BMCRR Rome 3955; CRI 11; RSC 18. 3.92g, 20mm, 10h.

Good Very Fine; hints of attractive golden iridescence, especially prominent around rev. devices.

Ex Roma Numismatics Ltd., E-Sale 35, 3 May 2017, lot 705.

Caesar's conquest of Gaul, which the reverse of this coin alludes to, with its captured Gallic spoils (the typical shield, the Gallic 'carnyx' or war horn, and axe), was the springboard from which he was to take control of the Republic and become its Dictator. It allowed him to grow his power base through both fame as the conqueror of so vast a region and of so many peoples, and through strength as the commander of an army that grew ever more experienced and fiercely loyal. His allocation of the provinces of Gaul also granted him a magistrate's immunity from the prosecution his enemies intended to conduct upon his return to Rome, which would undoubtedly have stunted his career. It was from his province of Cisalpine Gaul that he invaded Italy across the Rubicon, and he did so with the Legio XIII Gemina, who had fought for him in the major battles of his conquest of Gaul.

The importance of this conquest of Gaul to Caesar's career, and his awareness of this, is demonstrated by this coin. It was minted some time after he had left Gaul behind, by the mint which had moved with his army across the Mediterranean and beyond as it chased down the Optimates, most likely in Greece shortly after the victory over Pompey in Pharsalus. Yet the type harks back to these Gallic victories, reminding those he paid with these coins of his past as a Roman hero - a conqueror not of his own people, but of his people's enemies.

Estimate: 450 GBP